Schedule


Explore this section to learn about the On-Water-Intensive program, including daily activities, field trips, and lectures.

Monday, 6/18*. Meet at Fairmont Water Works at 9:15 AM and walk to Walnut St. Dock. We will be picked up by boat promptly at 10:00 am at the Walnut Street dock, under the Walnut St. bridge. After boating to the confluence of the Schuylkill River and the Delaware, we will head back up River to Bartrams Gardens. This session will end at Bartrams Gardens at 4p.
*For all meetings, bring your foul-weather gear, lunch, and, if you have one, a smart phone with camera. We will provide some drinks as well as field journals for hand-written notes and sketches; you may wish to post notes and pictures taken digitally with the hashtag #OnWaterIntensive and direct them @schuylkillcorps @ppehlab @ProfPeteD @AcadNatSci etc.

Guiding questions for session 1, led by Professors Peter DeCarlo and Bethany Wiggin:

Why do x-disciplinary researsch on the environment and on place?
Why this place, i.e., the lower, tidal Schuylkill River and Delaware confluence?
What do we know about it already? How do we know what we know about it, i.e., via what disciplines?
Why do we, the instructors and the conveners of the Schuylkill Corps, want to engage wider public participation with and on the River?
Before this first day, please prepare the reading and written assignments. These reading materials are available in the Reading pages on this WordPress. The assignment is listed on the Assignment pages and should be mailed as a word doc to (all three) bwiggin@sas.upenn.edu, pfd33@drexel.edu, and joannedoug@gmail.com. Over the course of the Intensive, selected authors’ reflections will be published on the Intensive blog on this page and may be re-published at http://www.ppehlab.org/blog/.

Tuesday, 6/19.* Depart promptly at 9:15a from the 19th Street side entrance of the Academy of Natural Sciences to travel up the Wissahickon Creek. We return to the Academy in the afternoon.
*Wear long pants; we will be donning waders–not good with bare legs. Prepare to get wet and muddy. Don’t forget your foul weather gear, lunch, field journal, smart phone, and plenty of sunscreen and water!

Objectives for session 2, led by Professors David Velinsky and Roland Wall:

provide students a basic understanding of riverine ecology with a focus on the special place that is a tidal freshwater environment and its connections between the watershed and the ocean.

We will first stop at the Morris Arboretum, just at the entrance. We aim to be at the second stop by 11:30, parking in the lot on Bells Mills Road (Forbidden Drive Upper Parking Lot on Google Maps. Depending on time, we will stop at the Philadelphia Canoe Club (off of Ridge Ave) parking lot. Our final stop is at the Fairmont Water Works.

Before we meet, please read the article by Holt and Miller, “Bioindicators.” It’s in the Readings menu for 6/19.

Wednesday, 6/20.* Meet at 9:15a at the Community Boathouse at Bartram’s Garden.
Guiding questions for session 3, led by Wiggin, with afternoon guest artists, 2018 Ecotopian Artists, Dylan Gauthier, Kendra Sullivan, and Marina Zurkow:

How do you research history in an “entangled” place?
How do you see and otherwise sense historical evidence in a riverscape constantly made and remade? (Famously, you can never step in the same river twice.)
How can present actors, including visitors to the river today, be engaged in writing and presenting the river’s history and present?
The morning session begins with a brief discussion of the readings. Participants then paddle or row to assigned spots up- and downriver from Bartram’s dock. We will consider the methods necessary to write histories for hidden or obscured places.

The hands-on afternoon artists-led workshop explores dark ecologies and then prompts participants to co-author a field guide to objects and sites on the lower Schuylkill.

*We will be boating in small craft. Dress expecting to get wet. Don’t forget your foul weather gear, lunch, field journal, smart phone, and plenty of sunscreen and water!

Thursday, 6/21.* Meet at 9:15a at Bartram’s Garden, inside and then on the riverbanks.
Objectives, led by PPEH Artist in Residence Jacob Rivkin: Provide students with a framework/guidebook for artistic practices that engage landscape, environment, data, play, and social activism. Also guide students on methods of generating ideas and connections, physically and digitally making, and documenting work.

In the morning we’ll start out with a group discussion and lecture on Public Art from a Landscape/Waterscape perspective. Afterwards, using the historical/biological/artistic toolkits developed over the past few days students will work in small groups to create site specific works using found materials which envision a Floating Monument to the Schuylkill River. Students will document the process of making, collaboration, and installation. In the afternoon, a guided tutorial in the computer lab at UPenn will teach students how to edit this footage together to create short films of their work.

Guiding Questions How have artists created work that engages the public and issues of landscape and water? How do you document and create a narrative around a site specific installation?

Public//Art//Land//Water Lecture Slides
Floating Monument Exercise

Afternoon at Charles Addams Fine Arts Hall at UPenn, PC Lab, Room 106 to learn how to edit video with Adobe Premiere Pro.

Friday, 6/22. Meet at 9:15 in Penn’s Van Pelt Library, the Seminar Room in the Weigle Information Commons (1st floor, west).
Facilitated by Wiggin and DeCarlo. Lunch is on PPEH!

Synthetic discussion of days 1-4; interdisciplinary discussion of key terms including “nature,” “wild,” “ecology,” “science,” “human,” “art,” and others.

Students outline project plans and collaborate to begin mapping experiences and paths for future research.

Monday, 6/25. Meet at 9:15a at Bartram’s Garden, inside the Coach House
Led by DeCarlo, Environmental policy, the refinery, and air emissions:

Students will be asked to think independently about what information they would want regarding the refinery, emissions, and the environment (please complete today’s assignment and find the readings here). A discussion of historical environmental policy focused on the 1970 Clean Air Act and amendments to the CAA up to the present. There will be a group discussion in the morning, followed by a discussion of environmental policy and the legal framework of the CAA. We will finish the afternoon with an exploration of existing datasets on the refinery emissions and impacts.

Tuesday, 6/26. Meet at 9:15 at Penn’s Landing to board boat.
Led by Velinsky and Wall, Biometrics, the Delaware estuary, climate change:

Today’s readings are available here. We will cruise down the Delaware and up the Schuylkill to the Fairmount Waterworks, stopping at four locations for sampling (water, plankton, sediments) and discussion. The Academy of Natural Sciences fish shocker boat will meet us to demonstrate the shocking for fish collection on a boat. The bigger boat will dock at the Walnut Street dock at Schuylkill River Banks at 1300. Further on-land activities to follow.

Wednesday, 6/27.* Meet at 9:15 at the University City Regional Rail station to take Septa’s Airport line. Further details tba.
Guiding questions, led by Wiggin:

How have the lines between land and water been drawn and re-drawn in southwest Philadelphia?
What impacts does this line have on community health?
What stories do we know about this water- and landscape?
Who tells them?
Today’s readings are available here.

Together with guest artists, Ann de Forest, Adrienne Mackey, and J.J. Tiziou, founders of the Walk Around Philadelphia project, we will walk spend the morning walking historic Mingo Creek. Our anticipated route, as mapped by Walk Around Philadelphia, is available here.

For more about Walk Around, click through to read the Walking Manifesto and “Walk Around Philadelphia.” More about the artists and about Walk Around Philadelphia is available via the project website.

In the afternoon, we will visit the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum to learn about the Refuge and to learn from guest presenter, Earl Wilson, President of the Eastwick Friends and Neighbors Coalition, about the Eastwick neighborhood, including the Refuge, and its rich and diverse history and present.

*Wear walking shoes and be ready for the possibility of getting wet as we walk Historic Mingo Creek in Eastwick and visit the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum.

Thursday, 6/28. Meet at 9:15 at the Septa stop at 33rd Street to board the 36 trolley to Eastwick.
Objectives, led by PPEH Artist in Residence Jacob Rivkin:

Provide students with a framework/guidebook for artistic practices that engage landscape, environment, data, play, and social activism. Also guide students on methods of generating ideas and connections, physically and digitally making, and documenting work.

Afternoon at Charles Addams Fine Arts Hall at UPenn, PC Lab, Room 106 for learning how to edit audio on Adobe Audition.

Friday, 6/29. Meet at 9:15 in Penn’s Van Pelt Library, the Seminar Room in the Weigle Information Commons (1st floor, west).
Facilitated by DeCarlo.


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